Guest post by Summer Associate Kristen Schalter

Football players took another hit in Tallahassee (pun intended) – this time in the workers’ compensation arena in the recent decision in Arena Football League v. Bishop, 2017 WL 2438335 (Fla. 1st DCA June 6, 2017). Bryon Bishop previously played for the Orlando Predators for one season and later wanted to rejoin the team. While participating in the Predators’ two-day tryouts in 2013, he suffered an on-field injury.

AFL Contract

Prior to participating in a tryout, a prospective Arena Football League (“AFL”) player is required to sign a contract.  Interestingly, the AFL contracts with players differently than the NFL. In the NFL, contracts are between individual teams and individual players, while in the AFL contracts are between the league itself and individual players.


Continue Reading AFL Player’s Workers’ Compensation Claim is Sacked by 1st DCA

10608742_10202856137579939_587007998374245216_oFall has arrived, which means professional football is in full swing on and off the field. While on-field activities are geared toward physical dominance, victory and relentless pursuit of the Lombardi Trophy, an equally competitive set of battles wages off field in the world of trademarks.

The National Football League (NFL) constitutes 30 teams and one of the strongest brands in the world. Not only do teams protect their names — BEARS, BUCCANEERS, PACKERS — but also their slogans – WE ARE ALL PATRIOTS, AMERICA’S TEAM, and of course logos. The 2015 football season, full of on-field excitement and drama, also brings two trademark cases that deserve mention.

SUPERB OWL confusing with SUPER BOWL?


Continue Reading 15 yards for Trademark Infringement?

8230562364_710b5ef675_mFootball fans around the globe may be rejoicing at the official start of the NFL season, but the cheering may be somewhat less than usual this year. That’s because a number of current and former NFL cheerleaders have filed lawsuits in Florida, New Jersey, New York, California and other states for violations of state and federal wage and hour laws, including the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The cheerleaders are claiming they were significantly underpaid—or in some cases not paid at all—for their services, which include performing during games, rehearsing prior to games, and attending community events. Teams that have been sued include the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, New York Jets, Buffalo Bills, Oakland Raiders and Cincinnati Bengals.

In the Florida Complaint, plaintiff Manouchcar Pierre-Val filed a proposed federal class action seeking to represent a class of cheerleaders who worked for the Tampa Bay Bucs within the last three years, and who were allegedly not compensated at the required minimum wages due under the FLSA. The lawsuit claims that the cheerleaders were paid only $100 per game for an average of 8 home games per season, plus limited wages for appearances made at paid corporate events. However, according to the complaint, the cheerleaders actually worked many more hours each week and each year for which they were not properly compensated as required by federal and Florida law. Plaintiff Pierre-Val alleges she received about $2.00 per hour for all of her services.


Continue Reading Football Season Off to a Litigious Start