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Katherine “Kati” Cook is an associate in the firm’s Business Litigation department based out of the Fort Myers office. She handles a variety of litigation matters, including FLSA, Title VII, ADA, contract and landlord/tenant disputes, and bankruptcy and creditors’ rights. Kati also provides litigation assistance to the Condominium and Homeowner's Association Group. She is admitted to practice in all Florida state courts.

While in law school, Kati served as publications editor of Ave Maria Law Review and was a legal intern for United States Middle District of Florida. She graduated top of her class from Ave Maria School of Law, was honored as a Lee County Association for Women Lawyer’s scholarship recipient, and was published in Volume 17 of the Ave Maria Law Review. Kati served as a summer associate with Henderson Franklin during the summer of 2018.

Kati was born and raised in Pine Island, Florida, graduating from Evangelical Christian School in Fort Myers. When not working, she enjoys spending time with her family, going out on the boat, and traveling.

PROFESSIONAL AND CIVIC AFFILIATIONS

Over the years, Kati has volunteered for the YMCA and Salvation Army. She currently serves on the board of Lee County Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division and is a member of the Lee County Association for Women Lawyers.

For many litigators, the best way to start a new year is with a new summary judgment standard! On December 31, 2020, the Florida Supreme Court issued an opinion, adopting the federal court’s summary judgment standard as articulated by the United States Supreme Court in Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242 (1986). This has been a long time coming for businesses as the federal standard may decrease legal expenses by expediting civil lawsuits and avoiding unnecessary trials. This decision may also alleviate the burden on Florida’s courts by allowing more cases to be resolved at the summary judgment phase.

Former Summary Judgment Standard

Summary judgment in Florida is governed by Rule 1.510. In pertinent part, Rule 1.510 previously provided the “summary judgment evidence on file must show there is no genuine issue as to any material fact.” Florida courts have taken a broad approach in interpreting “no genuine issue” by prohibiting the granting of summary judgment where there is the existence of any evidence of an issue of fact. In other words, if there was the “slightest doubt” raised, Florida courts would not grant summary judgment.

Federal Summary Judgment Standard


Continue Reading New Florida Summary Judgment Standard Could Lessen Legal Expenses and Judicial Backlog